I reviewed two of Miriam Wakerly’s books a while ago: Gypsies Stop tHere and No Gypsies Served. They were excellent, so when she said she’d written another one and asked if I wanted to review it, my response was a resounding “yes!” 

Needless to say, I was a little nervous. I’d loved the previous books because of the writing style, sure, but they’d been sent to me mainly because of my link to Gypsy culture, and I wasn’t sure whether I’d like the new one, which has no Romany ties. 

Well, I shouldn’t have been worried. Predictably, it was excellent.  

Review after the jump
The book follows the story of Steph, a single mother of two, who is carrying out the dying wish of one of Appley Green’s most well-loved residents: to ensure the senior citizens in the village have the help and friendship they both need and deserve. Whilst fulfilling her mission, she befriends one of her clients: Jackson, a famous architect, who quickly takes a prominent position in her life. 

As is the way with close-knit country communities, Appley Green has its own trials and triumphs, all of which Steph gets caught up in, to the frustration of Greg, her boss. But when it comes down to it, does Steph have the strength of character to deal with everything life is throwing at her, help all the people she wants to help and still manage to keep her job and family secure? 

Wakerly’s writing style is, as always, tantalising: the kind of gripping you only normally experience with crime novels. I started reading it on the train home, carried on with a cup of tea on my sofa, ran a bath and finished it by candlelight, with my legs hanging over the edge of the tub. I just couldn’t put it down. I think, short of a national emergency, I wouldn’t have moved from the bath for anything. As soon as I’d finished reading, I immediately flopped down on my bed and tapped out a gushing email to Miriam; the book was so good that it couldn’t possibly wait until morning. 

The twist at the end is completely unexpected, totally chilling, and leaves the way for a cliffhanger, making me desperately hope for a sequel. 

If you only read one book this year, make sure this is it. Proof that self-publishing can work, and yield immense talent. 

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