I had never been to a supperclub before last Thursday. There are usually Humans there, you see, and I prefer to spend my time at home alone given the choice.

However, I have secretly always harboured a desire to participate in a Galentine’s event. 

So when the BFF informed me that there was a Galentine’s supperclub happening in London, and that one of her best friends was running it, I decided I had to go along. Even though it meant going outside, and even though this particular one was happening outside of the three-mile radius around my house in which I normally operate.

It was worth the train journey and the peopling, which is probably the highest praise I could possibly give it.

The space was decorated beautifully, thanks to the creative talents of the BFF.

(You will have to excuse the bad quality of the pictures. It was dark, because it was an evening in February in England, and the walls were dark because the owner of the house has impeccable taste.)

The tables were set beautifully.

Hashtag balloons!

We were greeted with a glass of prosecco but were encouraged to bring our own drinks to go with the dinner. This pleased me because I am a wine snob, and any time I go to someone else’s house I worry that I’m going to be forced to drink terrible wine. I can’t help it, I’m French. And a bit of an arse.

I hadn’t read the invitation properly so I just took a bottle of red wine because it’s my favourite kind of wine; if I’d taken the time to look at what we’d be eating before I’d arrived I would have taken champagne instead, because bubbles go well with spicy food and also life doesn’t have enough champagne in it. However the red was adequate and the food was very very nice.

Alright, let’s get to the important bit.

We started with samosa chaat, which is one of my favourite things.

The daal had some kind of magic coconut thing going on; it was brilliant. The dish was large enough to tide us over to the next dish, but not so large as to fill us up.

Next on the list was the star dish of the night: aubergine chapattis.

It should be noted that everything was being made by hand, including the chapattis and the samosas, and there was a brilliant tamarind sauce that went alongside everything, which again had been created from scratch.

The smells of the food cooking mingled together with the sounds of people enjoying themselves and made the evening even more fun. In between courses, Vee stood up and introduced herself and Village Goleen, and talked about how the supperclub had come to exist. She is an excellent host and fantastic at commanding the attention of a room – I felt like I was getting a free side of stand-up comedy along with my meal.

Once we’d washed down our aubergine with a bit more wine, a mysterious dish appeared. Was it ice cream? Our table couldn’t tell. It turned out to be a kind of Pakistani rice pudding with pistachio and rose petals, and it was very good. I haven’t had rice pudding since I was about eight, and then it came from a tin. This did not come from a tin – it was, of course, made by hand, and it showed in the depth of flavour and the moreishness of something I wouldn’t normally have chosen from a menu.

If you have an event coming up, or if you’re just looking for a fun night in with the girls, I fully recommend Village Goleen for a Pakistani food experience. All the food we ate was vegan and there were gluten-free options too for those who required them. Take a look at Village Goleen’s Facebook page for more info and to book.


I wasn’t asked to write this review, and I paid for a ticket to the Galentine’s event, so this isn’t an ad or a sponsored post. I just had a nice time so thought I’d share it and encourage you to book too. 

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