Personal, Weekly Round-Ups

The Week I Went Swimming Again

Finally, things are starting to stabilise. Rather than having no energy at all, I have a teensy bit of energy, which lets me do about one thing requiring exertion per day, unless I am having a Particularly Bad Day, in which case no things are done.

That’s much better than being able to do one thing per week, though.

The doctors have said I can try doing a bit of exercise again, and as someone who normally swims every day, the fact that they recommended swimming was highly pleasing.

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Personal, Weekly Round-Ups

The Week I Got My Brain Back

Last week’s post left off just as I was about to go into hospital to find out when they’d be booking me in for surgery. I had been hoping that it might be fairly soon, since I’m apparently an urgent case and I’ve barely been able to leave the house in months, but hope is a treacherous and flighty beast, and of course things didn’t go quite so smoothly.

The waiting list for surgery is 4-6 months long; the minimum amount of time in which I’ll be booked for surgery is four months. Then there’s an eight-week recovery period, so basically whatever happens I’m essentially taking the rest of the year off.

They can’t push me up the list unless my Angry Internal Organs actually rupture, which made me start wishing they would, until I remembered that would have irritating potential side effects like involuntary sudden death. So I figured maybe I’ll obey the doctor’s instructions and not do anything to make this whole situation any more precarious, and look after my Angry Organs, and hopefully maintain this tenuous truce for as long as I can.

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child protection

New Law In Australia Shifts Burden Of Proof From Abuse Victims To Institutions

An article on ABC News reports a new law in Victoria, Australia, which shifts the burden of proof from abuse victims to the institutions in which the abuse took place.

This is a Very Very Good Thing. At the moment, when a child is abused and it’s covered up (or otherwise not addressed) by an institution, the burden of proof is on the child to demonstrate that the abuse took place, and that the organisation knew and did nothing.

This new law means that it’s no longer the victim’s responsibility to prove that they were abused – instead, it’s the organisation’s responsibility to demonstrate that they had enough safeguards in place to prevent abuse from happening, or that there’s a reason why they couldn’t have known it was taking place.

Continue reading “New Law In Australia Shifts Burden Of Proof From Abuse Victims To Institutions”

Personal, Weekly Round-Ups

This Week’s Round-Up Is Brought To You With Maybe A Tiny Glimmer Of Hope…

…she says, just waiting for it to be obliterated.

Last week’s post ended with me about to call the hospital and insist that they give me an appointment. According to the NHS website, the maximum waiting time for non-urgent procedures is 18 weeks. I was first seen on the 9th of March, and have been told several times since then that my case is an urgent one, and yet still I have no date for surgery.

I don’t blame the NHS for this. I’m a lefty, so I blame the Tories.

But regardless of who’s to blame, the fact is that the whole thing hasn’t exactly run smoothly. The week before last I was slotted in for an emergency endoscopy after the hospital forgot to send me an actual appointment, and then they were trying to make me wait until the 31st of July for the results appointment, which had originally been scheduled for the 19th of June. Some more digging around on the NHS website uncovered that, if the hospital cancels at the last minute for a non-clinical reason or otherwise messes up your appointment, they’re required to give you a new one within 18 days.

Armed with this information, last Monday I called the hospital.

Continue reading “This Week’s Round-Up Is Brought To You With Maybe A Tiny Glimmer Of Hope…”

Forensicating

Edewede Oriwoh on the Internet of Things

This week I caught up with Edewede Oriwoh, a researcher in cyber-physical security and the Internet of Things, and talked to her about the rise of smart homes and how people can keep themselves safe.

She had some very interesting things to say, not only about safety and security, but also about the philosophical and ethical implications of creating autonomous tech. And she’s a composer in her spare time, so generally a very cool person.

Read the full interview on Forensic Focus.

Personal, Weekly Round-Ups

This Week’s Round-Up Is Brought To You By Sunshine And Frustration

Last Monday was incredibly hot. It was also the day I had to go to hospital to have a tube shoved down my throat, so I wasn’t allowed to drink (or eat, but I don’t do that anyway atm) before my appointment.

The BFF came with me because I needed someone to take me home after sedation. Naturally, the clinic was running two hours late, so we sat in the inadequately air conditioned waiting room until 6pm, at which point I was finally called through.

I went in and sat on the little chair. The doctor looked a bit confused. She kept clicking different things on her screen and frowning.

I decided this was probably not a good sign.

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Personal, Weekly Round-Ups

Writing The Weekly Round-Up While I Try Not To Melt…

It is very hot today. The BBC says London could hit 33 degrees. I am not good with heat in general; my windows are all open from March-November, and as soon as it hits about 16 I start to feel too warm. I can’t help it, I’m from Scotland.

So today’s heat is a bit of a pain to begin with, and then there’s the added annoyance of the fact that I’m not allowed to drink water until 6pm.

Continue reading “Writing The Weekly Round-Up While I Try Not To Melt…”