2018 Reflections: Non-Fiction

The difficulty with writing this post is that almost all the non-fiction books I read this year were excellent, but I suppose that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t get a shout-out here as well.

So here are my favourite non-fiction books from this year. (Note that not all of these were published this year, that’s just when I read them.) Read more

Books I Read In 2018

Every year I say I’m going to keep track of all the books I’ve read, and every year I fail. I think I might finally have stumbled across a reliable way of doing it, but I only worked it out at the beginning of December so that’s not very helpful. However, here is a list of the books I’ve read this year and recorded somewhere; it’s probably missing 20-50 more which I read but didn’t review / make notes about / remember.

Where there are reviews, I’ve linked to these in the titles; and I’ve added notes to some of them too.

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Executing Windows Command Line Investigations by Hosmer, Bartolomie & Pelli

I met Chet Hosmer at DFRWS in Providence, Rhode Island, earlier this year. Over lunch I explained my upcoming digital forensics book to him, and he was very supportive. When I arrived back in England a copy of one of his books was waiting for me, along with an encouraging note.

Well, the DFIR book project has taken a backseat over the last few months due to me taking on a new psychology of religion research project, but maybe it’ll come back. In the meantime I thought I’d take a look at Chet’s book and write a quick review of it.  Read more

Silence Is My Mother Tongue by Sulaiman Addonia

I was sent this book to review, and I liked the sound of it immediately because of the title. I have a bit of an obsession with silence, and its causes and effects.

The book focuses on the story of Saba, who lives in a refugee camp but dreams of leaving and going to university. One day she wants to be a doctor, helping people who need it and using her intellect to make a difference in the world.  Read more

The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon

I was pretty sure I’d love this book, because I grew up in a cult and as an adult I’ve done some work in counter terror. The story focuses on Phoebe, a Korean-American college student who becomes enraptured by the magnetic personality of John Leal, who runs an exclusive cult. The cult members all live together in a big house, and Phoebe ends up moving in with them. Leal has ties to North Korea, which intrigues Phoebe too.  Read more