Books, Forensicating

SQLite Forensics by Paul Sanderson

SQLite forensics is an important part of many digital forensic investigations. Most smartphones and computer operating systems use SQLite, with each device often including hundreds of databases. Despite this extreme proliferation, SQLite forensics is often overlooked in conversations about current trends in digital forensics. Paul Sanderson’s book attempts to redress the balance and bring attention to the importance of SQLite forensics. Continue reading “SQLite Forensics by Paul Sanderson”

Forensicating

Techno Security 2018 Round-Up

This article is a recap of some of the main highlights from the Techno Security & Forensic Investigation Conference 2018, which took place in Myrtle Beach, SC from the 3rd-6th June 2018.

Under the sunny skies of South Carolina, the digital forensic community got together at the beginning of June this year to discuss topics ranging from international espionage to the admissibility of evidence obtained from the cloud. Continue reading “Techno Security 2018 Round-Up”

Books, Forensicating

Some Of My Favourite Digital Forensics Books

I read a lot. I write a lot. I work a lot. Sometimes these things coincide. One of the ways they coincide is through writing books about my day job, for which I also read books other people have written.

Here are a few of my favourite digital forensics books I’ve read over the past few years, which I’d recommend if you’re looking for relevant reading material.  Continue reading “Some Of My Favourite Digital Forensics Books”

Books, Forensicating

Mobile Forensics – Advanced Investigative Strategies by Oleg Afonin & Vladimir Katalov

Mobile forensics is a growing subsection of digital forensic investigation. With the proliferation of devices, applications and operating systems available nowadays, it’s increasingly becoming a vital and complex field. The skillset needed to accurately acquire evidence from mobile devices may seem dauntingly wide-ranging, especially when so many of us are dealing with backlogs in the first place. How are we supposed to keep up to date with this ever-evolving challenge?

Luckily we have books like this to help us out. Continue reading “Mobile Forensics – Advanced Investigative Strategies by Oleg Afonin & Vladimir Katalov”

Workspace in home: fingers on laptop keyboard, red apple, legs in socks on a wooden floor and colored carpet
Forensicating

Digital Forensics Resources

One of the most frequent questions I get from digital forensics students is about resources: where can they go to continue learning, where can they find out more about the industry, what are the best blogs and social accounts out there for DFIR people?

The below is by no means an exhaustive list, but here are some of the places I get my computer forensics news from, which you might find helpful.  Continue reading “Digital Forensics Resources”

Forensicating, Writing

First Steps In Digital Forensics – What Would You Like To See?

Last year I wrote a book. It’s called Windows Forensics Cookbook and I didn’t really want to write it, but I’m glad I did because now I know I can. It was a little too technical for my liking, really: I would have liked to have written something meatier in terms of text, and less screenshotty.

So this year I’m writing another book. With a working title of First Steps In Digital Forensics, it will be aimed at people who want to get into the industry. Whether you’re a student of a related discipline, a professional looking to switch industries, or just someone who’s intrigued by the field and wants to know what it’s really like, this book will have something for you.

Continue reading “First Steps In Digital Forensics – What Would You Like To See?”

Books, Forensicating, Investigation

Interview With Oleg Skulkin, Author, Windows Forensics Cookbook

A while ago I published a book. It’s a digital forensics textbook, and the guys over at Forensic Focus, where I normally write digital forensics related stuff, wanted me to promote it there. I couldn’t work out how to do that though: normally we either review books or interview the authors, but I couldn’t review my own book and I didn’t want to interview myself.

Enter Oleg, my co-author and very useful person, who took on more of the book than he’d originally agreed to when I got ill halfway through the process. Today I interviewed him on Forensic Focus about what he does as a day job, how he came to write the book, and what he thinks the most important current challenges are in digital forensics.

Take a look at the interview on Forensic Focus