It had been a while since I’d read anything by Nietzsche, but I revisited him this week and did not have the reaction I’d expected. I know I’ve read Twilight of the Idols before, but I couldn’t remember much about it, although I do remember enjoying On the Genealogy of Morality.

I thought I’d enjoy re-reading him. I didn’t. While he’s very good at pithy aphorisms, there’s a sense of superiority that never used to bother me but now really does. He is so very sexist; more than just “Well he lived in sexist times,” but in a way that reads as degrading. (more…)

I have been in love with Søren Kierkegaard since I was seventeen years old. I read The Sickness Unto Death, and then Fear and Trembling and The Book on Adler, and I was hooked. Never before had I read anything which had chimed so perfectly with who I am.

I revisit Kierkegaard frequently, and my favourite book of his remains Fear and Trembling. However, I didn’t read Works of Love for the first time until about five years ago. I re-read it this week, and it reminded me just how much I love Kierkegaard’s writing. (more…)

I found this a little reductionist and introductory, and I don’t agree with him on all the points, but it’s not a bad intro to Kierkegaard if you’ve been wondering about this Danish philosopher and his views. 

Transcript

Christian philosopher Søren Kierkegaard didn’t mince words when he addressed the lack of passion that marked the church of his day. What can we learn from Kierkegaard today? Dr. Sproul will explain. (more…)

The ways in which people interpret the world have always amazed and intrigued me. How two people can look at the same situation, be armed with the same knowledge about it, and yet still come out with different conclusions (aka ‘politics’). How two people can have a very similar experience and yet react in wildly different ways. How something that can floor one person won’t bother another.

But even more subtly: how the individual ways in which we think about the world – our personal hermeneutics – help us to see things through a unique lens.

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Roger Penrose is my favourite living physicist. He has had a prolific career to date, and he shows no signs of slowing down.

I first encountered Penrose’s work after reading In Search of Schrödinger’s Cat by John Gribbin. The book sparked my interest in quantum physics, and after a while I stumbled upon The Emperor’s New Mind and then Shadows of the Mind by Penrose.

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Robin Lane Fox,  Emeritus Fellow of New College, Oxford and Reader in Ancient History, University of Oxford, has recently released a new book about Augustine. I picked it up the last time I went into Waterstones, because it had a pretty cover and because I find Augustine’s views generally interesting.

Winner of the Wolfson Prize for History 2015, the book charts Augustine’s life up to and including his writing of the Confessions. It compares and contrasts his path with those of other thinkers of his time, including the pagan Libanius.

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