Books

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

A house burns to the ground while the family who live in it stand outside and watch. All bar two, that is: the absentees are the father, who is away at work, and the youngest daughter Izzy. Everyone knows it was Izzy who burned the house down, because that’s just like her: ever a wild child, impossible to control, Izzy has been the family’s unpredictable rebel practically since the day she was born.

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Books

How Not To Be A Boy by Robert Webb

At the moment I’m writing a novel. The protagonist is a teenage boy. His name is Anthony and he’s dealing with a lot of things in his life, one of which is the underlying current of societal expectations of masculinity. This isn’t exactly a huge theme in the book, but I think it’s probably an important part of any boy’s upbringing, so I want to get it right. I decided therefore to read some things about what it’s like to grow up male.

I am not, and nor have I ever been, male. However I have always empathised with expectations of masculinity. I’ve been the breadwinner in every household I’ve lived in since a young age, and I’ve been surrounded by people and situations that made showing any kind of emotion discouraged. Growing up, I felt pressured to swallow whatever I might have been feeling and essentially ‘man up and get on with it.’ Despite not knowing what it’s like to be a boy, therefore, I have perhaps an above-average level of empathy for the challenges brought on by society’s expectations of masculinity.

Enter Webb’s autobiography.

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Books

Weekly Reading List #4: Artistry, Masculinity, Lisbeth, And House Of Leaves

I knew there would eventually be a post in which this gif would be sadly relevant.

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Books

Weekly Reading List #2 – Wine, Weather And Whodunnits

I read quite a lot of books last week, but several of them were very short. Most of them were novels – I seem to be on a fiction drive at the moment.

There were a few that were disappointing, which was a shame, and one or two surprises. So without further ado, here are this week’s reviews.

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Books, Forensicating, Investigation

Practical Forensic Imaging by Bruce Nikkel

51tosmvhokl-_sx376_bo1204203200_Any book that begins with a foreword by Eoghan Casey is almost guaranteed to be a vital and immensely useful read in the field of digital forensics, and Practical Forensic Imaging is no exception.

The need to securely preserve digital evidence is of the utmost importance to any investigator, particularly in criminal cases where findings may need to be upheld in a courtroom situation. Despite the huge impact of this subject matter, however, there have been precious few books on the topic to date. Luckily, Practical Forensic Imaging steps in now to fill the gap.

Read the full review on Forensic Focus

Books

The Conscious Mind by David J. Chalmers

I do like a book that raises questions. And while The Conscious Mind by David J. Chalmers wasn’t the most compelling book I’ve ever read about the philosophy of mind, it nonetheless had some interesting questions to ask.

If you’re just starting to read about philosophy of mind, this is probably a good one to read. It ties together the psychology, neuroscience and philosophy quite nicely, without going into too much depth about any of them.

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Books

The Occult Tradition by David S. Katz

The Occult Tradition by David S. Katz is a book I read a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed, mainly because it didn’t just discuss dubious claims of current witches dating back their ancestry to ancient Egypt, but took an in-depth look at ‘occult’ concepts in a very literal sense – in the sense of discussing hidden or obscure material.

A lot of the book focused on Jewish and Christian mysticism, which was interesting because again this isn’t something that’s always heavily discussed in books on occult themes.

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