Books of the Week: Winter Walks, Counselling, Apéros and Voodoo

This year I have a lot to read, which is exciting. I’m starting uni this week, which I’m sure will bring its own reading list; I’m working on a couple of new papers; I’m writing a novel; and of course there’s the usual TBR pile of things I’ve found that looked interesting.

Last week I read four books, although the first one is cheating a bit; it took me a full two weeks to read because it was a textbook, so although I finished it this week even I am not quite a fast enough reader to manage fitting in a textbook around working full-time.  Read more

Tidying Up With Scar

This week I’ve been thinking about Marie Kondo, because so has everyone else. From everything I’d ever heard about her, I thought I’d strongly dislike her. The phrase “spark joy” makes me think of a peppy blonde American woman who assumes you can happy your problems away. You know the ones: the people who tell you the power of positive thinking will cure your chronic illness.

I’m a pretty tidy person by nature; whenever I put stuff down on a surface, I automatically put it down precisely aligned. This amuses and occasionally concerns people. And from what I’d heard of Marie Kondo besides the “spark joy” phrase, it sounded like her approach to tidying was just common sense: do you need it? do you like it? If the answer to both of those questions is ‘no’, then throw it away.

The reality is a little more complicated than that. And since I had some Netflixing time this week anyway, I thought I’d check out her show, which I liked.  Read more

2018 Reflections: Non-Fiction

The difficulty with writing this post is that almost all the non-fiction books I read this year were excellent, but I suppose that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t get a shout-out here as well.

So here are my favourite non-fiction books from this year. (Note that not all of these were published this year, that’s just when I read them.) Read more

Books I Read In 2018

Every year I say I’m going to keep track of all the books I’ve read, and every year I fail. I think I might finally have stumbled across a reliable way of doing it, but I only worked it out at the beginning of December so that’s not very helpful. However, here is a list of the books I’ve read this year and recorded somewhere; it’s probably missing 20-50 more which I read but didn’t review / make notes about / remember.

Where there are reviews, I’ve linked to these in the titles; and I’ve added notes to some of them too.

Read more

Executing Windows Command Line Investigations by Hosmer, Bartolomie & Pelli

I met Chet Hosmer at DFRWS in Providence, Rhode Island, earlier this year. Over lunch I explained my upcoming digital forensics book to him, and he was very supportive. When I arrived back in England a copy of one of his books was waiting for me, along with an encouraging note.

Well, the DFIR book project has taken a backseat over the last few months due to me taking on a new psychology of religion research project, but maybe it’ll come back. In the meantime I thought I’d take a look at Chet’s book and write a quick review of it.  Read more

Silence Is My Mother Tongue by Sulaiman Addonia

I was sent this book to review, and I liked the sound of it immediately because of the title. I have a bit of an obsession with silence, and its causes and effects.

The book focuses on the story of Saba, who lives in a refugee camp but dreams of leaving and going to university. One day she wants to be a doctor, helping people who need it and using her intellect to make a difference in the world.  Read more