Books

Weekly Reading List #6: Classics, Hope And Hunger

Based on several things that have happened this year, I’ve been focusing my mind on doing more academic stuff in 2018. My psychology research has taken a backseat over the past couple of years, but I’d like to revive it. So currently my reading lists partly reflect that desire; there are several projects I’d love to work on, and I’m doing a bit of reading around each one to see which would be best to work on next.

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Books

Reviving The Classics

An interesting initiative from Head of Zeus publishing brings us Apollo: a collection of books that might have been known as classics, if the fashions of the times hadn’t relegated them to relative obscurity.

The idea is to give older works a new lease of life, and release them to an audience who otherwise almost certainly wouldn’t have read them.

Over the weekend, I picked up two of them – The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence, and The Hungry Grass by Richard Power – and took a look.

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Music

The Most Influential Albums In My Life

These days I tend not to listen to many albums, at least not one track after another on repeat, the way I used to when I had cassette tapes and then CDs.

Now that Spotify is in my life, most of my music is organised into playlists with titles like “Fuck Yeah”, “Mother-Friendly Playlist”, “Leave Me Alone”, “Work Fucking Harder”, and so on.

But from time to time there’s still an album that captures me enough to make me want to listen to it all the way through, and then listen again, and then buy the CD to make sure I definitely have it forever.

Here are some of my favourite albums throughout my life.

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Books

Tolkien, Badass Journalists and Long French Novels

I was discussing favourite childhood books with a friend the other day, and we got onto the subject of classics. “I loved The Mill on the Floss“, I told her, “and I was worried I wouldn’t like it when I reread it again a couple of years ago, but it was as wonderful as ever.”

“Hang on,” she replied, “The Mill on the Floss was required reading in Preliminary Honours in 1961. You were a precocious brat.”

Yes, yes I was.

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