The Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt

Sometimes I read a book and think it’s something everyone should read. It happens rarely, because different people like different things, etc. But it does happen. And A Righteous Mind is one of those books.

I think it’s especially important for people who, like me, consider themselves politically liberal and find themselves stunned by conservative reasoning. How is it possible that they just don’t care, you think, shaking your head in despair at yet another tweet coming from the wrong side of the gun control argument, or the abortion argument, or something else that plucks at your ethical guitar and makes an out-of-tune twang.

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Eighteen-Year-Old Scar on Nietzsche

I’ve been going through my notebooks for the past couple of months. There are loads of them, going back to when I was twelve. In one of them, I found this, which I wrote when I was eighteen.

I read Nietzsche’s On The Genealogy of Morals whilst sitting in a little wooden hut selling tickets for a festival. These are some of the notes I scribbled down while I was reading.

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Ten Important Questions

Last week I wrote about How To Think Like Leonardo da Vinci, a book I discovered which talks the reader through various exercises towards self-improvement.

I wasn’t planning to chart my progress on the blog, and I might not do after today (unless anyone desperately wants me to), but my mother’s staying and it’s really hard to write a blog post from scratch when there are humans in your house.

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