child protection

New Law In Australia Shifts Burden Of Proof From Abuse Victims To Institutions

An article on ABC News reports a new law in Victoria, Australia, which shifts the burden of proof from abuse victims to the institutions in which the abuse took place.

This is a Very Very Good Thing. At the moment, when a child is abused and it’s covered up (or otherwise not addressed) by an institution, the burden of proof is on the child to demonstrate that the abuse took place, and that the organisation knew and did nothing.

This new law means that it’s no longer the victim’s responsibility to prove that they were abused – instead, it’s the organisation’s responsibility to demonstrate that they had enough safeguards in place to prevent abuse from happening, or that there’s a reason why they couldn’t have known it was taking place.

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Personal

Ten Positive Lessons I Learned From Growing Up In A Cult

I have had an odd life. I often feel like I’ve lived several of them already, in fact. One of them was as a cult member.

My mother started going along to their meetings when I was three-ish. She joined properly a few years later, and I didn’t manage to extract myself until I was in my late teens. I had many negative experiences growing up in a cult (naturally), but I also learned some good lessons from it, and had some positive experiences too. So today I thought I’d focus on the latter and share some of those in a post.

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Books

Book Reviews: Religion, Philosophy, Forensics, and Leonardo da Vinci

I am so impressed with 2016 as a Year of Books so far. From the moment I picked up Solitude on day one and completely fell in love with it, my luck with book lists has remained at an excellent level.

This week was no exception. Four books, three of them excellent, one of them quite good.

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Personal

Winterquiettime

I have led the kind of life that sets one up to hate Christmas.

Brought up a Jehovah’s Witness, my mother and I didn’t celebrate it when I was a child. While other ex-JW adults often talk about feeling as if they missed out, Child Scar never felt that way. The JWs do a good job of explaining to their children (and anyone else who’ll listen) the Pagan origins of the Christmas festival, and how it’s got nothing to do with Jesus’ birth at all, really.

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