Books

Empire of Things by Frank Trentman

I’ll start this review with the most obvious point: this book is Not Small. Weighing in at 862 pages, it is hardly a little light reading. It is also quite difficult to read on the train, being huge and a hardback.

For such a big book spanning such wide subject matter, however, it is surprisingly readable. I got through it in a few days, because I devour books the way other people devour pizza (I also devour pizza), and I found the writing style to be just right: not too dense, but also not patronising the reader.

Continue reading “Empire of Things by Frank Trentman”

Academia, Books, Philosophy

2016 Reflections – Books (Non-Fiction)

2016 was seriously the best year I’ve had for books in ages. Despite it not being a great year for, well, pretty much everything else globally.

But in times like these, you grab what happiness you can get, right? So here are my favourite non-fiction books of 2016.

Continue reading “2016 Reflections – Books (Non-Fiction)”

Books

The Munich Art Hoard by Catherine Hickley

We define ourselves so much by what we have.

Some people feel the need to “keep up with the Joneses”, buying bigger fridges and sports cars and filling their houses with the latest tech. Others buck current trends, preferring to demonstrate their allegiance to counter-culture with objects that the Joneses wouldn’t consider worthwhile.

And even if the decision to buy specific stuff isn’t as considered as those examples, we still define ourselves by our surroundings, especially if we’ve chosen them.

Continue reading “The Munich Art Hoard by Catherine Hickley”

Miscellaneous

Three-Day Quote Challenge: Day Three

I was tagged by Estprophet518 to do a three-day quote challenge. And I like challenges, and I also like quotes, so I figured why not?

The idea is to post three quotes each day for three days. Here’s day three.

Continue reading “Three-Day Quote Challenge: Day Three”

Books

Weatherland by Alexandra Harris

Oh 2016, I am greatly enjoying the books you send my way.

Weatherland was sent to me for review by the good folks at Thames & Hudson. It is basically the most English book ever written: charting the history of a country’s art and literature through its weather.

Continue reading “Weatherland by Alexandra Harris”