Books, Forensicating

SQLite Forensics by Paul Sanderson

SQLite forensics is an important part of many digital forensic investigations. Most smartphones and computer operating systems use SQLite, with each device often including hundreds of databases. Despite this extreme proliferation, SQLite forensics is often overlooked in conversations about current trends in digital forensics. Paul Sanderson’s book attempts to redress the balance and bring attention to the importance of SQLite forensics. Continue reading “SQLite Forensics by Paul Sanderson”

Books, Forensicating

Some Of My Favourite Digital Forensics Books

I read a lot. I write a lot. I work a lot. Sometimes these things coincide. One of the ways they coincide is through writing books about my day job, for which I also read books other people have written.

Here are a few of my favourite digital forensics books I’ve read over the past few years, which I’d recommend if you’re looking for relevant reading material.  Continue reading “Some Of My Favourite Digital Forensics Books”

Weekly Round-Ups

How Do You Fit It All In? #6

The latest instalment in a series in which I answer the ongoing question “How do you fit it all in?”, which people ask me when I tell them what I do.  Continue reading “How Do You Fit It All In? #6”

Books

30 Books That Have Influenced My Life

On Tuesday I turned thirty. Happy birthday to me.

I’m making up for never talking about or celebrating my birthday in the past by themeing a few posts around the number 30 this week. Also because it’s easy to come up with post titles that way, and I’m feeling lazy. Continue reading “30 Books That Have Influenced My Life”

Books, Forensicating

Mobile Forensics – Advanced Investigative Strategies by Oleg Afonin & Vladimir Katalov

Mobile forensics is a growing subsection of digital forensic investigation. With the proliferation of devices, applications and operating systems available nowadays, it’s increasingly becoming a vital and complex field. The skillset needed to accurately acquire evidence from mobile devices may seem dauntingly wide-ranging, especially when so many of us are dealing with backlogs in the first place. How are we supposed to keep up to date with this ever-evolving challenge?

Luckily we have books like this to help us out. Continue reading “Mobile Forensics – Advanced Investigative Strategies by Oleg Afonin & Vladimir Katalov”

Investigation

How Do Criminals Communicate Online?

Flashpoint, a business intelligence agency specialising in the deep and dark web, recently published a report on the economy of criminal networks online. The report looks not only at where criminals go to communicate on the internet, but also how their communications are structured, and the ways in which online communication has changed the criminal landscape.

Far from the kind of jack-of-all-trades portrayed in TV dramas, today’s cybercriminals structure their operations much like a business, each person having their own specialisms and reporting to the people above them. This helps to ensure that every member of the network takes on tasks that don’t overwhelm them, and often also ensures that the level of communication is kept to a minimum. Each party is only in contact with the level directly above, thus decreasing the likelihood of breaking up the entire network if a single individual’s identity is uncovered by law enforcement.

Read the full article on ForensicFocus

Forensicating, Investigation

John Patzakis on how a new Federal Rule of Evidence will affect digital investigators

The other day I interviewed John Patzakis, Executive Chairman at X1 Discovery, about an article he’s written about a new amendment to Federal Rule of Evidence 902.

Subsection (14) will come into play this December, and will mean that all electronic data will be required to be “self-authenticating”.

Continue reading “John Patzakis on how a new Federal Rule of Evidence will affect digital investigators”