Books

The British Book Awards: Debut Book Of The Year Nominees

One of the things I love about my life is how flexible it is. I spent most of last weekend on the phone to various doctors because my body’s being a pain again. They said they’ll need to do a load more tests (cue more hospital time) and told me to take it easy, to spend lots of time resting for the next few weeks and to go to bed early. So I emailed the lovely people at FMCM and said I had a bit of extra reading time on my hands… and they sent me the nominees for the British Book Awards!

These are all up for Debut Book Of The Year. I’m going to write mini reviews of each of them, and talk about which one I’d like to see win.  Continue reading “The British Book Awards: Debut Book Of The Year Nominees”

Books

Weekly Reading List #6: Classics, Hope And Hunger

Based on several things that have happened this year, I’ve been focusing my mind on doing more academic stuff in 2018. My psychology research has taken a backseat over the past couple of years, but I’d like to revive it. So currently my reading lists partly reflect that desire; there are several projects I’d love to work on, and I’m doing a bit of reading around each one to see which would be best to work on next.

Continue reading “Weekly Reading List #6: Classics, Hope And Hunger”

Academia, Books, Philosophy

2016 Reflections – Books (Non-Fiction)

2016 was seriously the best year I’ve had for books in ages. Despite it not being a great year for, well, pretty much everything else globally.

But in times like these, you grab what happiness you can get, right? So here are my favourite non-fiction books of 2016.

Continue reading “2016 Reflections – Books (Non-Fiction)”

Poetry

autumn leaves: a poem

autumnleaves

the leaves are falling now
the first signs that the trees are getting tired.
unable to sustain their grip anymore,
they rescind their grasp reluctantly
and the leaves they’ve borne so carefully til now
drop to the ground like so many raindrops

if they make ripples on the earth, we do not see them
their landing is too light
their descent was too gentle
they fall beside the trunks that upheld them
above the roots that grew them
and there they wait, right where they fell
for a gust of wind to come and whip them away
rehoming them again
far from the trees they once called their own.

Books

Weatherland by Alexandra Harris

Oh 2016, I am greatly enjoying the books you send my way.

Weatherland was sent to me for review by the good folks at Thames & Hudson. It is basically the most English book ever written: charting the history of a country’s art and literature through its weather.

Continue reading “Weatherland by Alexandra Harris”