psychology

Unsociability and the ethics of the unconscious

In my quest to focus more on academic work this year, I’m ploughing through papers in psychology and philosophy. Without a university email address this is unfortunately quite expensive, but them’s the breaks when you’re an independent scholar.

This week I read two papers: The Ethical Relevance of the Unconscious in Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine, by Farisco & Evers; and Does It Matter When We Want To Be Alone? Exploring Developmental Timing Effects in the Implications of Unsociability in New Ideas in Psychology, by Coplan, Ooi & Baldwin.  Continue reading “Unsociability and the ethics of the unconscious”

Books

2017 Reflections: Books – Non-Fiction

Following on from yesterday’s best fiction post, here are the best non-fiction books I read this year. (Note that not all of these were published this year, that’s just when I read them.)

The following are abridged reviews; where there’s a longer version on the blog, I’ve linked to it.

Continue reading “2017 Reflections: Books – Non-Fiction”

Books

Weekly Reading List #1 – Brain Surgery, Demons, And Poems

Previously I’ve been mini-reviewing books in the reading list section at the end of my weekly round-ups, but they’ve been getting a bit long and unwieldy of late so I thought I’d move them to their own separate post.

Sometimes a book will merit a post all of its own, or I’ll be given a book by a publisher in exchange for a full review, in which case they’ll be reviewed separately. But I do like to keep track of the books I’ve read and what I liked / disliked about them, and I read so much that I don’t have time to write full reviews of everything. So here we go: the first of the weekly book review lists.

Continue reading “Weekly Reading List #1 – Brain Surgery, Demons, And Poems”

Books

The Conscious Mind by David J. Chalmers

I do like a book that raises questions. And while The Conscious Mind by David J. Chalmers wasn’t the most compelling book I’ve ever read about the philosophy of mind, it nonetheless had some interesting questions to ask.

If you’re just starting to read about philosophy of mind, this is probably a good one to read. It ties together the psychology, neuroscience and philosophy quite nicely, without going into too much depth about any of them.

Continue reading “The Conscious Mind by David J. Chalmers”