Books, Forensicating

Executing Windows Command Line Investigations by Hosmer, Bartolomie & Pelli

I met Chet Hosmer at DFRWS in Providence, Rhode Island, earlier this year. Over lunch I explained my upcoming digital forensics book to him, and he was very supportive. When I arrived back in England a copy of one of his books was waiting for me, along with an encouraging note.

Well, the DFIR book project has taken a backseat over the last few months due to me taking on a new psychology of religion research project, but maybe it’ll come back. In the meantime I thought I’d take a look at Chet’s book and write a quick review of it.  Continue reading “Executing Windows Command Line Investigations by Hosmer, Bartolomie & Pelli”

Books, Forensicating

SQLite Forensics by Paul Sanderson

SQLite forensics is an important part of many digital forensic investigations. Most smartphones and computer operating systems use SQLite, with each device often including hundreds of databases. Despite this extreme proliferation, SQLite forensics is often overlooked in conversations about current trends in digital forensics. Paul Sanderson’s book attempts to redress the balance and bring attention to the importance of SQLite forensics. Continue reading “SQLite Forensics by Paul Sanderson”

Books

12 Rules For Life by Jordan Peterson

In February I received an email from Penguin Random House asking if I wanted to review 12 Rules For Life. I’d never heard of Jordan Peterson or his book, so I said yes. It arrived a couple of weeks later and I tried to read it.

I gave up about halfway through.  Continue reading “12 Rules For Life by Jordan Peterson”

Books

2017 Reflections: Books – Non-Fiction

Following on from yesterday’s best fiction post, here are the best non-fiction books I read this year. (Note that not all of these were published this year, that’s just when I read them.)

The following are abridged reviews; where there’s a longer version on the blog, I’ve linked to it.

Continue reading “2017 Reflections: Books – Non-Fiction”

Books

Weekly Reading List #1 – Brain Surgery, Demons, And Poems

Previously I’ve been mini-reviewing books in the reading list section at the end of my weekly round-ups, but they’ve been getting a bit long and unwieldy of late so I thought I’d move them to their own separate post.

Sometimes a book will merit a post all of its own, or I’ll be given a book by a publisher in exchange for a full review, in which case they’ll be reviewed separately. But I do like to keep track of the books I’ve read and what I liked / disliked about them, and I read so much that I don’t have time to write full reviews of everything. So here we go: the first of the weekly book review lists.

Continue reading “Weekly Reading List #1 – Brain Surgery, Demons, And Poems”

Books

Empire of Things by Frank Trentman

I’ll start this review with the most obvious point: this book is Not Small. Weighing in at 862 pages, it is hardly a little light reading. It is also quite difficult to read on the train, being huge and a hardback.

For such a big book spanning such wide subject matter, however, it is surprisingly readable. I got through it in a few days, because I devour books the way other people devour pizza (I also devour pizza), and I found the writing style to be just right: not too dense, but also not patronising the reader.

Continue reading “Empire of Things by Frank Trentman”

Academia, Books, Philosophy

2016 Reflections – Books (Non-Fiction)

2016 was seriously the best year I’ve had for books in ages. Despite it not being a great year for, well, pretty much everything else globally.

But in times like these, you grab what happiness you can get, right? So here are my favourite non-fiction books of 2016.

Continue reading “2016 Reflections – Books (Non-Fiction)”