Last year I wrote a book. It’s called Windows Forensics Cookbook and I didn’t really want to write it, but I’m glad I did because now I know I can. It was a little too technical for my liking, really: I would have liked to have written something meatier in terms of text, and less screenshotty.

So this year I’m writing another book. With a working title of First Steps In Digital Forensics, it will be aimed at people who want to get into the industry. Whether you’re a student of a related discipline, a professional looking to switch industries, or just someone who’s intrigued by the field and wants to know what it’s really like, this book will have something for you.

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I know I spent most of it working. In the early part of the week I designed a survey which is going to be sent out to digital forensic investigators. It includes a couple of questions that relate to some research I’d eventually like to do on the psychological effects of working full-time (or part-time, or at all) in a role that requires you to see some of the most awful things humans do to each other.

My job’s a bit of a conversation stopper. When I say “forensic investigation”, people generally think it’s incredibly cool. When I specify “computer forensics” they make reference to Garcia from Criminal Minds, or (if they know me well enough) to Lisbeth Salander.

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A lot of people seem fascinated when I tell them what I do for a living (well, one of the things), so I thought I’d write a blog post about it.

The specific strand of my life that generates all the interest is forensic investigation. To be fair, it is a pretty awesome job and I do feel like a badass when I’m doing it. But a lot of it is way less glamourous than people seem to expect, probably because they’ve watched too much CSI.

So what do I do, if it’s not all ultra-glamourous labs, flashy command lines and 45-minute mysteries?

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