It had been a while since I’d read anything by Nietzsche, but I revisited him this week and did not have the reaction I’d expected. I know I’ve read Twilight of the Idols before, but I couldn’t remember much about it, although I do remember enjoying On the Genealogy of Morality.

I thought I’d enjoy re-reading him. I didn’t. While he’s very good at pithy aphorisms, there’s a sense of superiority that never used to bother me but now really does. He is so very sexist; more than just “Well he lived in sexist times,” but in a way that reads as degrading. (more…)

I have been in love with Søren Kierkegaard since I was seventeen years old. I read The Sickness Unto Death, and then Fear and Trembling and The Book on Adler, and I was hooked. Never before had I read anything which had chimed so perfectly with who I am.

I revisit Kierkegaard frequently, and my favourite book of his remains Fear and Trembling. However, I didn’t read Works of Love for the first time until about five years ago. I re-read it this week, and it reminded me just how much I love Kierkegaard’s writing. (more…)

A few months ago, tired of people going “How do you fit it all in?!”, I started a blog series to answer that exact question. It was partly for other people but also partly for me; I wasn’t sure how I fitted it all in either. The answer used to be “I barely sleep” but these days I’m often in bed by 8pm, sometimes significantly earlier, so I knew it wasn’t that.

But apparently I still manage to live many lives and do loads of things. So how do I do it? This week marks week 21 of my ‘How Do You Fit It All In?’ series so I thought I’d go back through them and work out if there’s a direct answer to that question.  (more…)

I found this a little reductionist and introductory, and I don’t agree with him on all the points, but it’s not a bad intro to Kierkegaard if you’ve been wondering about this Danish philosopher and his views. 

Transcript

Christian philosopher Søren Kierkegaard didn’t mince words when he addressed the lack of passion that marked the church of his day. What can we learn from Kierkegaard today? Dr. Sproul will explain. (more…)

In my quest to focus more on academic work this year, I’m ploughing through papers in psychology and philosophy. Without a university email address this is unfortunately quite expensive, but them’s the breaks when you’re an independent scholar.

This week I read two papers: The Ethical Relevance of the Unconscious in Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine, by Farisco & Evers; and Does It Matter When We Want To Be Alone? Exploring Developmental Timing Effects in the Implications of Unsociability in New Ideas in Psychology, by Coplan, Ooi & Baldwin.  (more…)